CHANTE GLOSTER | Marlton Real Estate


Have you ever discovered you needed a piece of furniture that you can't readily find or your space requirements leave you with limited choices? Options still exist, and they can be a perfect match not only for your space but for your style as well.

First, identify what you need

Measure the available spot and height. Then, have in mind the type of furniture that you need there. A multi-purpose function is critical if space is an issue. For example, find a small chest of drawers to stand that TV on so that there is extra storage underneath. Knowing what you need is essential since with a couple of strategic steps you could create it, but only if you first determine what the result should be. 

Then, figure out from where the furniture will come 

Some great places to find pieces are thrift stores and garage sales. The furniture will not look the same when you finish, so view it with your creative mind's eye. When shopping for your furniture, it does not have to meet the exact dimensions if you can make adjustments once you bring it home. For example, if you need an end/bedside table for a daybed, but it is hard to find one tall enough, find something that you can work with and change the legs to give it the correct height. 

Next, bring it home

It doesn’t quite work yet. It still needs adjustments and probably is not the correct style. Having it already home gives you the ability to see how it fits into the room. Once you have it in its space, you can check that it is suitable, decide the exact corrections that you need to make, and figure out which color selection you will settle on. Take lighting and other colors of the room into consideration. Determine if this piece will match existing colors or be a splash-of-color accent piece.Here is where style becomes a reality.

Finish it up

You can now create the vision that you identified before shopping. One of the simplest ways to change the look of something is with paint. Depending on the style that you are going for the furniture can have one color, marbled coloring, or if you’re a little brave, a design. The option also exists to re-stain it if you happened to have found a wooden piece that you like but has the wrong wood tone. If the sound of marbling is intriguing, take the article outside. Paint the base color as a solid, then water down the second color and lightly paint over the first or dip the brush in and splash it onto the piece until you achieve a design that you like. 

Have fun! 

Think beyond the furniture store! Have fun filling the spaces in your home and making memories in the process. Your handiwork will not only fulfill your furniture need but will become a conversation piece you should be proud of for years to come.



Preparing your home is one of the most important things you can do before leaving for an extended period of time.

Whether you have a vacation home that you spend your summer months in, you travel for work, or you simply have a second property that will be unoccupied for an extended period of time, it’s vital to take the steps to preparing the home for the elements while you are gone.

In this article, we’ll talk about winterizing, preparing a home for heavy rains, and protecting it from a number of external forces. That way you can rest assured that your property will be safe while you’re away, saving you money in costly repairs.

Winterizing

Many Americans spend the winter months in a warmer climate. Similarly, it has become quite common to purchase vacation homes and cabins in the northern part of the country to visit during the summer months. Regardless, these homes will have to be winterized to avoid damage.

First, and most important, be sure to turn off the water at the main supply sources. Next, open up your faucets and drain all of the lines that carry water throughout your home and yard. Drain, and put away your garden hose, to protect it and your fittings from damage.

Now that you’re protected against water damage, you’ll want to protect against potential fires. Turn off and unplug all appliances. Not only is this a way to avoid fire, but it will also help you avoid needlessly spending on electricity.

It’s a good idea to turn your thermostat down so that your home is kept above freezing, but not at a needlessly high temperature.

Preparing a home for extended leave

Even if your home isn’t facing the winter cold, there are still measures that should be taken during an extended leave.

Cleaning your refrigerator out completely and then washing the interior will help avoid odors from spreading throughout the house.

Other odors can arise from the drains in your home, especially if it’s likely to get hot. To prevent this you can cover up your drains with painter’s tape.

You’ll also want to remove any food from your cabinets that could attract mice, ants, or other pests. While you’re cleaning, wash and put away any linens that you won’t be using for some time.

Be sure arrangements have been made at the post office for any mail you receive at your home. You could set up mail forwarding, have neighbors take in your mail, or purchase a PO box for the time you’re away. Regardless, it’s a good idea to not have mail piling up outside an empty home as it could attract the attention of those seeking to benefit from your house being vacant.

Before leaving, make sure all windows and doors are closed and locked. Remove any spare keys from obvious locations around your home, and make arrangements for someone, such as a neighbor, to check on the home and report any problems to you.



Moving into a new house will require a little bit of cleaning and the kitchen is probably the first place to start. You will want to get rid of the former resident's cooking smells as well as make it reflect your personal taste because you and your family will spend a lot of time. Here are a few tips on cleaning the kitchen in your new home.

  1. Clean the Oven and Stove - Take a look inside your oven, and if it’s needed, use an oven-cleaner. The solution should take about 20 to 30 minutes to work, giving you the time you need to clean the rest of the stove. Be sure to check under the hood and make use of a grease remover if the regular cleaners aren't working well enough at getting off the grease out. After cleaning the top and front of the stove, move it away from the wall and then wash its backside. You should also clean the sides too, as well as the front panel and temperature dials.
  2. Clean the Fridge - Having cleaned the stove and oven, you can now tackle the refrigerator. While likely cleared out by the previous owners, nevertheless, it's always a good idea to clean it thoroughly. A thorough cleaning means removing the drawers and bins and cleaning them out. You should wash the inside walls and shelves too, removing everything that can be removed and soaking it in the sink separately. If the fridge sat disconnected from power, scrub the inside and clean it carefully if it needs it. If it hasn’t been unplugged, then you should do that and let it warm up a little before scrubbing it, as this will make it easier. A soft cloth works perfectly at wiping down, as anything tougher will scratch the surface. Be sure to clean beneath the fridge, as well as the top and sides too.
  3. Clean the Floors - If your new home already came with a carpet installed, you should probably hire professional cleaners to steam clean them before you and your family move in. Where that won’t be possible for you, a thorough vacuum will probably suffice. Confirm from the previous owners if they had any pets, so you know how to take precautions against possible fleas, particularly if you are moving with pets of your own. Where the floors are wooden or faux wood, thoroughly sweep the floor, cleaning the underside of heating vents and all stationary appliances. 

When you finish, you can take a well-deserved break to go say hello to your new neighbors.



There is a lot to think about when you know you’re ready to sell your home. The best approach is to take things step-by-step in order to get everything right. 


Make Necessary Repairs


Before you even decide to put a “for sale” sign out front, you’ll want to address the problems in your home that you know about. If the roof needs to be replaced, or you know you need a new refrigerator, you should tend to those things as soon as possible. While these items can be an expense for you, completing these things before the sale of the home will increase the value of the home and save you some aggravation when it comes time for the home inspection.


Don’t forget about the small details as you look at what needs to be done on your property. Does the doorbell ring? Are the lightbulbs all working? These small details are just as important as the big stuff.   


Find A Real Estate Agent


Finding a real estate agent isn’t a one-size-fits-all job. You want an agent who understands your needs and is an expert in your particular market. You can check with your family and friends to see if they have a particular agent who they recommend. Also, you might check out reviews online to help you discover an agent. Do you have a particular agency in mind? Give them a call and they can set you up with one of their agents. Many agents will be happy to provide a number of references of recent sales if you inquire. 


Find Out How Your Home Will Be Marketed


If your home won’t be on social media, there’s something wrong with the marketing plan. You’ll need lots of good photos and maybe even a video tour of your home. You should definitely be sure that your home is being marketed on YouTube, Facebook, and Instagram to name a few social networks. These networks even offer paid ads to help you reach the right buyers. Talk with your realtor to see what the plan for marketing your home sale is.


Prepare For Home Showings


While you still might need to live in your home while you’re selling it, you want the property to be presentable. Start at the curb of your home and work your way to the inside. The property should look presentable from the moment buyers pull up to the house. The lawn should be mowed, the landscaping should be trimmed, and the inside of the home should be thoroughly cleaned. This will seal the deal on the sale of your property after all of the other hard work has been done.   



When you’re showing your home, you need to stage the home properly to impress buyers. Buyers need to be able to get an idea of what it would be like to live in the home. No matter what your own lifestyle is, or what problems you have had in the home, there are certain things that you probably don’t want to share with anyone who could be a potential buyer on a walk through. 


Any Kind Of Taxidermy


Although you may enjoy hunting and taxidermy, there are few things that creep out potential buyers more than seeing animals that were formerly alive hanging on your wall. It’s been shown that taxidermy often gives buyers a sense of dread and can creep them out. Yes, that bear rug may be comfy and quite the accomplishment, but not everyone will share the same sentiment as you. Be sure to get all of these animal displays out of your home when you’re getting ready to sell it and show the property.


Personal Collections That May Be A Bit On The Strange Side


It’s really cool if you want to collect dolls, clowns, or have some kind of a celebrity shrine in your home. It’s cool for you, that is. Keep these items to yourself, especially when the home is going to be shown. Any room that could be considered too full of any one kind of item should be redecorated slightly before a home showing. 


Weapons


Weapons are on the same spectrum as taxidermy. Many people may have differing opinions with you on the subject and it could creep some buyers out. If you have any kinds of guns or knives displayed in your home, you should put them away for showings. These items can make buyers feel very uncomfortable and leave them turned off by your home.       



Political Items


If you like to get political, know that many people who are potentially going to buy your home probably don’t share your views or interests. Keep any politically charged signs and organizational symbols out of view for the showing of your home. Buyers may not be able to relate, and in turn, end up being turned off by your home.     


Bug Traps Or Mouse Traps


We all have experienced bugs or mice in our homes at one time or another. When the house goes up for sale, you don’t want to advertise this by keeping any kinds of traps in view of buyers. People will get creeped out easily by the thought that pests have infested the home at some point. Although the home inspection will probably note that there was some type of a pest problem in the home, you don’t want to lose potential buyers because a mouse trap was in view.